QUARTERLY REPORTS

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QUARTER 4 - 2016 (OCT 1 - DEC 31)

Numbers are correct as of January 16, 2017

NATIONAL REPORT
Q4 - 2016

CWHC

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ONTARIO/NUNAVUT REPORT
Q4 - 2016

CWHC

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ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY REGION

Region Mammals Birds Other Total
Pacific 64 27 1 92
Prairie 66 70 6 142
Central Canada 50 193 24 267
Atlantic 18 71 27 116
North 31 5 0 36
TOTAL 229 366 58 653

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY PROVINCE

Province Mammals Birds Other Total
Alberta 13 32 0 45
British Columbia 64 27 1 92
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 4 6 4 14
Newfoundland and Labrador 1 2 0 3
Northwest Territories 0 1 0 1
Nova Scotia 7 43 20 70
Nunavut 25 0 0 25
Ontario 23 75 15 113
Prince Edward Island 8 18 3 29
Québec 27 118 9 154
Saskatchewan 54 37 6 97
Yukon 6 4 0 10

NOTE: Not all provinces submit animals to the CWHC for testing.

CAUSE OF DEATH

Province Emaciation Infectious/Inflammatory Toxicity/Poisoning Trauma Other
Birds 27 42 24 143 39
Mammals 35 41 4 46 35
Other 3 11 0 11 17
TOTAL 65 94 28 200 91

NOTE: An additional 175 cases submitted to CWHC in this quarter are still pending cause of death determination; 87 birds, 72 mammals, and 16 other species. ‘Other’ diagnoses include neoplastic, metabolic, and degenerative diseases as well as those cases where no cause of death could be determined.


SELECTED DISEASE COUNTS

  Examined Positive  
Rabies 253 5 Provincial summary
White Nose Syndrome 39 0 Provincial summary
Avian Influenza 1144 197 Provincial summary
Chronic Wasting Disease 322 32 Provincial summary
Bovine Tuberculosis 54 0 Provincial summary
Avian Cholera 152 8 Provincial summary

Provincial Rabies Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 4 0
British Columbia 7 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 4 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 4 1
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 12 0
Prince Edward Island 4 1
Québec 185 1
Saskatchewan 30 2
Yukon 3 0

Provincial White Nose Syndrome Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 2 0
British Columbia 1 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 4 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 1 0
Prince Edward Island 1 0
Québec 4 0
Saskatchewan 23 0
Yukon 3 0

Provincial Avian Influenza Summary [CLOSE]

DEAD BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 221 0 0 0
British Columbia 132 2 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 226 63 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 62 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 15 1 0 0
Nova Scotia 4 0 0 0
Nunavut 15 0 0 0
Ontario 21 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 2 0 0 0
Québec 0 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 0 0 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

LIVE BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 0 0 0 0
British Columbia 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 57 8 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 389 123 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 0 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0 0 0
Québec 0 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 0 0 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

Provincial Chronic Wasting Disease Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 1 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 23 0
Ontario 3 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 2 0
Saskatchewan 292 32
Yukon 1 0

Provincial Bovine Tuberculosis Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 1 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 1 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 25 0
Ontario 3 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 2 0
Saskatchewan 21 0
Yukon 1 0

Provincial Avian Cholera Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 16 0
British Columbia 1 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 3 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 1 0
Northwest Territories 1 0
Nova Scotia 10 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 48 0
Prince Edward Island 9 0
Québec 61 0
Saskatchewan 17 8
Yukon 2 0

NOTE: The cases reported above represent the data that are currently available in the CWHC database and should be considered preliminary. These data do not include all diagnostic testing for the selected pathogens carried out in Canada; additional testing is performed by other agencies and organisations. Examined refers to any candidate species for this disease. Testing is not always performed, unless the disease is suspected during necropsy or histological examination.


DIAGNOSTIC HIGHLIGHTS

Chronic wasting disease in Saskatchewan

In association with Ministry of Environment, the CWHC Western/Northern region at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine has been conducting targeted and scanning surveillance for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) among cervid species for the past 20 years. With close to 46,000 cases examined the CWHC has tracked the geographic and species spread of this disease across Saskatchewan. In 2016 approximately 300 animals were examined, 32 of which were positive for CWD including animals from new geographic locations in Saskatchewan. In addition to surveillance the CWHC is also involved in research aimed at providing additional management options to promote healthy deer, elk and moose populations in this region.

Read more about our CWD program and the disease itself

http://www.cwhc-rcsf.ca/cwd.php


WILDLIFE HEALTH TRACKER

On the Bighorns of a Dilemma: wild and domestic sheep in BC

Since early last century and maybe before, a correlation between the introduction of domestic sheep and declines in bighorn sheep populations were noted.  Pneumonia outbreaks resulting in 30-90% mortality in previously healthy bighorn sheep populations were often followed by years of poor lamb recruitment.  Despite decades of research into the causes of these die-offs, it is only recently that researchers were able to find convincing evidence of at least one trigger, a species of bacteria, Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.


Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/bighorns-dilemma-wild-domestic-sheep-bc/

Building Northern capacity to monitor wildlife health aims to protect seal, caribou and narwhal resources

The Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (CWHC) is partnering with the University of Calgary and the University of Prince Edward Island to launch two projects to build community capacity in wildlife health surveillance in the Canadian Arctic, combining indigenous and scientific knowledge to conserve wildlife and protect food security and safety in the Arctic.


Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/building-northern-capacity-to-monitor-wildlife-health-aims-to-protect-seal-caribou-and-narwhal-resources/

 

Dolphin strandings in Québec & Atlantic Canada this fall

Several stranding events involving white-sided dolphins were documented in the Gulf of St. Lawrence during the two first weeks of October by the Réseau québécois d’urgences pour les mammiféres marins and the Marine Animal Response Society. Over that period, multiple white-sided dolphins stranded alive on Anticosti Island.


Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/dolphin-strandings-in-quebec-atlantic-canada-this-fall/

 

Canada well represented at North American Symposium for Bat Research

From October 12 to 15, hundreds of North American bat researchers came together in San Antonio, Texas, to present their latest discoveries in the world of bats at the North American Symposium for Bat Research (NASBR). Canada was well represented at this symposium and multiple Canadian students even won prestigious awards for the presentation of their research.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/canada-well-represented-at-north-american-symposium-for-bat-research/


FEATURED PROJECT

Wildlife Health Intelligence Platform

The CWHC is pleased to announce that the development of our next generation of wildlife health information software is under development.

In the last 25 years, approximately 500,000 animals have passed through the hands of CWHC staff for either a diagnostic assessment or testing for a specific disease. That information is stored in a centralized national database, which enables wildlife health professionals to store and access their own data and view similar data from across Canada.

The current system is designed with this data storage and access focus in mind. Our new system is designed to take the next step and help transform data into knowledge so that it is more useful to more people and more responsive to emerging questions and scenarios. In addition to diagnostic and testing data, the system will handle observational data (e.g. citizen science) and external sources of data in a bid to broaden our scope of knowledge and provide a better tool set for decisions makers in a wildlife health context.

CWHC recently received funding from Agriculture Canada and Agri-food Canada to speed up the development of this new platform and we anticipate that the new system will be ready for beta testing in January of 2018 with a full release scheduled for March 30 of 2018.

The new Wildlife Health Intelligence Platform (WHIP) will allow the CWHC to grow its reputation as the international standard for national wildlife health programs.

 

QUARTER 3 - 2016 (JUL 1 - SEP 30)

Numbers are correct as of Oct 17, 2016

NATIONAL REPORT
Q3 - 2016

CWHC

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ONTARIO/NUNAVUT REPORT
Q3 - 2016

CWHC

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ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY REGION

Region Mammals Birds Other Total
Pacific 77 41 15 133
Prairie 97 126 38 261
Central Canada 64 248 15 327
Atlantic 38 107 17 162
North 15 7 2 24
TOTAL 291 529 87 907

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY PROVINCE

Province Mammals Birds Other Total
Alberta 13 7 9 29
British Columbia 77 41 15 133
Manitoba 5 0 0 5
New Brunswick 3 9 3 15
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 10 0 10
Northwest Territories 6 3 0 9
Nova Scotia 15 19 1 35
Nunavut 0 1 0 1
Ontario 34 87 7 128
Prince Edward Island 20 69 13 102
Québec 30 161 8 199
Saskatchewan 79 119 29 227
Yukon 9 3 2 14
TOTAL 291 529 87 907

NOTE: Not all provinces submit animals to the CWHC for testing.

CAUSE OF DEATH

Province Emaciation Infectious/Inflammatory Toxicity/Poisoning Trauma Other
Birds 53 83 24 168 68
Mammals 27 52 5 87 49
Other 0 24 0 15 31
TOTAL 80 159 29 270 148

NOTE: An additional 190 cases submitted to CWHC in this quarter are still pending cause of death determination; 124 birds, 55 mammals, and 11 other species. ‘Other’ diagnoses include neoplastic, metabolic, and degenerative diseases as well as those cases where no cause of death could be determined.


SELECTED DISEASE COUNTS

  Examined Positive  
Rabies 445 17 Provincial summary
Avian Cholera 157 0 Provincial summary
Avian Influenza 850 57 Provincial summary
Avian Botulism 157 9 Provincial summary
Newcastle Disease 487 1 Provincial summary
West Nile Virus 485 23 Provincial summary

Provincial Rabies Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 5 0
British Columbia 43 5
Manitoba 5 0
New Brunswick 3 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 1 0
Nova Scotia 5 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 18 1
Prince Edward Island 10 0
Québec 289 0
Saskatchewan 61 11
Yukon 5 0

Provincial Avian Cholera Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 4 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 1 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 1 0
Nova Scotia 2 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 32 0
Prince Edward Island 12 0
Québec 48 0
Saskatchewan 56 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Influenza Summary [CLOSE]

DEAD BIRD

Province Tested Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 153 0 0 0
British Columbia 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 2 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 7 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 55 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 32 0 0 0
Québec 66 1 0 0
Saskatchewan 177 50 6 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

LIVE BIRD

Province Tested Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 0 0 0 0
British Columbia 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 4 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0 0 0
Québec 0 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 354 6 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

Provincial Avian Botulism Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 4 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 1 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 1 0
Nova Scotia 2 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 32 3
Prince Edward Island 12 0
Québec 48 6
Saskatchewan 56 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Newcastle Disease Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 7 0
British Columbia 5 1
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 9 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 10 0
Northwest Territories 3 0
Nova Scotia 19 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 79 0
Prince Edward Island 58 0
Québec 161 0
Saskatchewan 132 0
Yukon 3 0

Provincial West Nile Virus Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 7 0
British Columbia 2 2
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 9 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 10 0
Northwest Territories 3 0
Nova Scotia 19 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 82 8
Prince Edward Island 58 0
Québec 161 10
Saskatchewan 132 3
Yukon 3 0

NOTE: The cases reported above represent the data that are currently available in the CWHC database and should be considered preliminary. These data do not include all diagnostic testing for the selected pathogens carried out in Canada; additional testing is performed by other agencies and organisations. Examined refers to any candidate species for this disease. Testing is not always performed, unless the disease is suspected during necropsy or histological examination.


DIAGNOSTIC HIGHLIGHTS

Discovery of Whirling Disease in Canada

  • In August 2016, Parks Canada noted some brook trout (Salvelinus fontainalis) with suspicious swimming behaviour at Johnson Lake in Banff National Park.
  • The BC Animal Health Centre/CWHC BC diagnosed the fish with the first known Canadian case of whirling disease, a parasitic infection caused by Myxobolus cerebralis.
  • The parasite infects the bony tissues of the head, vertebra and fins of salmonids causing the characteristic whirling swimming pattern.
  • The disease can cause significant mortalities in fish populations.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/discovery-of-whirling-disease-in-canada/

Trichomonosis now in Ontario as well as Atlantic Canada

  • Further to the cases of trichomonosis diagnosed in PEI this spring, more purple finches, goldfinches and pine siskins with trichomonosis infections were seen in Newfoundland, New Brunswick and eastern Ontario, indicating the disease may be spreading in Canadian finches.
  • Trichomonosis is an infectious disease caused by a parasite that causes lesions in the throat.  Affected birds may drool, regurgitate, have difficulty swallowing or breathing.  Emaciation is common.
  • Bird feeders and baths can be sites of transmission for the parasite.  A new factsheet is available for download to raise awareness of this disease in feeder birds. http://www.cwhc-rcsf.ca/fact_sheets.php

 Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/parasite-infects-atlantic-finches/


WILDLIFE HEALTH TRACKER

CWD detected near Edmonton

This is the furthest west the disease has been documented in Canada. The province of BC is asking hunters to be on alert and submit heads for testing, as early detection is key.

http://www.theprovince.com/news/local+news/discovery+chronic+wasting+disease+near+edmonton+real+concern/12171918/story.html

 

A batty summer in SK

An unusual number of bats were submitted to CWHC Western/Northern this summer.  Most were healthy juvenile bats. Education is required to help the public deal with bats on their property in a safe and bat-friendly way.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/a-batty-summer-in-saskatchewan/

 

Hunters contribute to wildlife health

Hunters are best placed to make critical observations of unusual behaviours or mortality events in wildlife.  The CWHC encourages hunters to report what they see and submit samples.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/hunters-contribute-to-wildlife-health-surveillance/

 

Alveolar hydatid disease in a chipmunk

CWHC Ontario discovered a chipmunk filled with hydatid cysts due to an Echinococcus multilocularis tapeworm infection.  This parasite is only recently discovered in Southern Ontario.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/alveolar-hydatid-disease-in-a-chipmunk/


FEATURED PROJECT

Assessing Beluga Health in the Beaufort Sea

In July 2016, a team including veterinarians from the CWHC Québec and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans partnered with Inuvialuit hunters from Tuktoyaktuk, NWT  to perform health assessments on belugas whales harvested in the Beaufort Sea.  

Complete necropsies were carried out, samples taken for histological examination, assessment for parasites, blood chemistry, contaminants, genetics, dietary studies and screening for other infectious agents.

The results will be shared directly with communities in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region providing information on the safety and security of the Beaufort beluga population as a food source.

This is part of a long-term monitoring project that involves many partners including the Fisheries Joint Management Committee & the University of Saskatchewan.

 

QUARTER 2 - 2016 (APR 1 - JUN 30)

Numbers are correct as of July 21, 2016

NATIONAL REPORT
Q2 - 2016

CWHC

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ONTARIO/NUNAVUT REPORT
Q2 - 2016

CWHC

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ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY REGION

Region Mammals Birds Other Total
Pacific 66 20 0 86
Prairie 58 84 13 155
Central Canada 64 91 65 220
Atlantic 43 87 15 145
North 7 7 0 14
TOTAL 238 289 93 620

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY PROVINCE

Province Mammals Birds Other Total
Alberta 1 2 6 9
British Columbia 66 20 0 86
Manitoba 5 0 0 5
New Brunswick 3 16 15 34
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 3 0 0 3
Nova Scotia 13 31 0 44
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 35 40 23 98
Prince Edward Island 27 40 0 67
Québec 29 51 42 122
Saskatchewan 52 82 7 141
Yukon 4 7 0 11
TOTAL 238 289 93 620

NOTE: Not all provinces submit animals to the CWHC for testing.

CAUSE OF DEATH

Province Emaciation Infectious/Inflammatory Toxicity/Poisoning Trauma Other
Birds 18 36 9 128 50
Mammals 13 62 2 55 59
Other 0 29 0 3 54
TOTAL 31 127 11 186 163

NOTE: An additional 102 cases submitted to CWHC in this quarter are still pending cause of death determination; 48 birds, 47 mammals, and 7 other species. ‘Other’ diagnoses include neoplastic, metabolic, and degenerative diseases as well as those cases where no cause of death could be determined.


SELECTED DISEASE COUNTS

  Examined Positive  
Rabies 311 16 Provincial summary
White Nose Syndrome 51 9 Provincial summary
Avian Influenza 505 4 Provincial summary
Snake Fungal Disease 21 5 Provincial summary
Newcastle Disease 289 0 Provincial summary
West Nile Virus 289 0 Provincial summary

Provincial Rabies Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 20 2
Manitoba 4 0
New Brunswick 3 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 9 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 55 12
Prince Edward Island 15 0
Québec 176 0
Saskatchewan 28 2
Yukon 1 0

Provincial White Nose Syndrome Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 1 0
New Brunswick 3 1
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 4 3
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 16 4
Prince Edward Island 1 1
Québec 9 0
Saskatchewan 17 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Influenza Summary [CLOSE]

DEAD BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 48 0 0 0
British Columbia 14 0 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 10 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 5 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 19 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 15 0 0 0
Québec 12 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 18 0 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

LIVE BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 0 0 0 0
British Columbia 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 144 2 0 2
Prince Edward Island 0 0 0 0
Québec 0 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 220 2 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

Provincial Snake Fungal Disease Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 21 5
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 0 0
Saskatchewan 0 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Newcastle Disease Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 2 0
British Columbia 20 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 16 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 31 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 40 0
Prince Edward Island 40 0
Québec 51 0
Saskatchewan 82 0
Yukon 7 0

Provincial West Nile Virus Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 2 0
British Columbia 20 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 16 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 31 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 40 0
Prince Edward Island 40 0
Québec 51 0
Saskatchewan 82 0
Yukon 7 0

NOTE: The cases reported above represent the data that are currently available in the CWHC database and should be considered preliminary. These data do not include all diagnostic testing for the selected pathogens carried out in Canada; additional testing is performed by other agencies and organisations. Examined refers to any candidate species for this disease. Testing is not always performed, unless the disease is suspected during necropsy or histological examination.


DIAGNOSTIC HIGHLIGHTS

Death by dinner: Barred Owl vs. rough-skinned newt

  • In April, a Barred Owl (Strix varia) was submitted to the BC Animal Health Centre, home of the BC node of the CWHC.  The owl was emaciated and had a mostly-intact rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa) in its proventriculus (the avian equivalent of a stomach).
  • Rough-skinned newts are extremely toxic, producing a type of tetrodotoxin, a potent neurotoxin most famously occuring in pufferfish.  Most newts can produce enough toxin to kill 25,000 mice, earning them the title of the most toxic amphibian in the Pacific Northwest.
  • Because they are so toxic, rough-skinned newts are highly unusual prey for most animals. In this case, the owl was severely emaciated, so perhaps starvation drove it to eat this highly unusual prey-item.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/death-by-dinner/

 

Trichomonosis in PEI finches

  • In June 2016, residents reported unusual mortalities of purple finches (Carpodacus purpureus) in several areas of PEI.  Carcasses were submitted to the Atlantic Region of the CWHC where a diagnosis of Trichomonosis was confirmed. 
  • Trichomonosis is an infectious disease caused by the Trichomonas parasite.  Due to lesions in the throat, affected birds may drool, regurgitate, have difficulty swallowing or show laboured breathing.  Emaciation is common.
  • Rarely diagnosed in the past, it is increasing common in finch populations in Atlantic Canada.  Trichomonosis in the United Kingdom is associated with significant population declines in some finch species.
  • The disease is transmitted by feeding regurgitated food to young during the breeding season and by contaminated food and water.  Bird feeders are a common site of transmission.
  • CWHC engaged with nature and birding organizations in PEI on social media to raise awareness of the disease and recommend temporary removal of bird feeders and feeder disinfection.  Reports of dead or sick finches is recommended to better understand the impacts of the disease.

 Read more

https://www.facebook.com/islandnaturetrust/posts/1149891988405372?comment_id=1152776871450217&comment_tracking=%7B%22tn%22%3A%22R2%22%7D


WILDLIFE HEALTH TRACKER

BC responds to threat of White-nose syndrome

Since white-nose syndrome was discovered in Washington State, BC has ramped up monitoring efforts.  A network of community bat projects have been submitting bat mortalities.  Recent tests of 24 bats were negative for P. destructans.  Surveillance will continue as it is critical to detect entry of the fungus into the province early so as to slow the spread of the disease.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/british-columbia-responds-to-threat-of-white-nose-syndrome/

 

First European detections of Chronic Wasting Disease in reindeer and moose.

A wild reindeer was discovered with CWD in Norway in April 2016. This was the first documented case in a wild reindeer and in Europe.  In May and June, two moose almost 300km from the reindeer, were also confirmed to have the disease.  The spread of CWD in Europe is concerning as once the disease is established it has proven near impossible to eradicate.  What is of grave concern to Canadians, is the occurrence of CWD in a wild reindeer which indicates that CWD (currently well known in Saskatchewan deer) could spread to Canada's caribou populations many of which are already at risk

http://www.vetinst.no/sykdom-og-agens/chronic-wasting-disease/the-first-detection-of-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-in-europe
http://www.nature.com/news/deadly-animal-prion-disease-appears-in-europe-1.19759

 

CWHC engaging with trappers

Parasites can have an impact on wildlife health but also can reduce the quality and value of pelts. There is concern that dog louse is increasing, particularly in coyotes, leading to animals with "shoulder patches", where guard hairs are damaged by chronic scratching.  Lice are not a cause of mortality, but studies suggest that severely infested canids have a higher probability of contracting other diseases. The CWHC is building partnerships with trappers and the fur industry to monitor parasites and other diseases of interest.
http://aep.alberta.ca/fish-wildlife/wildlife-diseases/documents/LiceCoyotes-Sep-2015.pdf
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/home/about/divisions/wildlifeconservation/pdfs/reports/fy14_14.25_control_infestation_of_dog_louse_in_gray_wolves.pdf

 

2015 a tough year for black bears

The BC Animal Health Centre noticed high numbers of cub abandonments and stunted growth in black bears in 2015.  Investigations suggest that a significant number were infected with an apicomplexan parasite, Sarcocystis spp. The parasite may have affected feeding and increased risk of trauma for the bears.  This combined with poor berry crops may have lead to malnutrition and an increased tendency to abandon cubs.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/why-was-2015-a-tough-year-for-bcs-young-black-bears/


FEATURED PROJECT

Health Intelligence for the modern age

CWHC Ontario/Nunavut in partnership with Wilfrid Laurier University and the CWHC National Office are currently developing and piloting a web-based reporting tool that aims to enhance wildlife disease surveillance in Ontario. It is important to incorporate wildlife health and disease knowledge into domestic animal and public health planning and disease management. Web-based reporting of wildlife mortality and morbidity events in wildlife populations will enable us to fill important gaps in our disease surveillance activities.

There are 3 main components to this project: 1) development of the tool; 2) piloting the tool with select groups of hunters and biologists; and 3) assessment of the tool as a way to enhance ongoing wildlife disease surveillance activities in Ontario. Our long term goals are to adapt and distribute the tool for use by other groups with interest in wildlife health and disease and explore options to link this tool with other wildlife related citizen science initiatives.

This project was partially funded by the OMAFRA-University of Guelph Strategic Partnership, under the Disease Surveillance Plan, which is a joint federal-provincial Growing Forward 2 project.

 

QUARTER 1 - 2016 (JAN 1 - MAR 31)

Numbers are correct as of April 18, 2016

NATIONAL REPORT
Q1 - 2016

CWHC

DOWNLOAD

 

ONTARIO/NUNAVUT REPORT
Q1 - 2016

CWHC

DOWNLOAD

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY REGION

Region Mammals Birds Other Total
Pacific 70 64 0 134
Prairie 60 32 13 105
Central Canada 50 78 10 138
Atlantic 27 86 0 113
North 4 2 0 6
TOTAL 211 262 23 496

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY PROVINCE

Province Mammals Birds Other Total
Alberta 4 1 0 5
British Columbia 70 64 0 134
Manitoba 2 0 0 2
New Brunswick 6 11 0 17
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 3 1 0 4
Nova Scotia 17 60 0 77
Nunavut 0 1 0 1
Ontario 29 27 4 60
Prince Edward Island 4 15 0 19
Québec 21 51 6 78
Saskatchewan 54 31 13 98
Yukon 1 0 0 1
TOTAL 211 262 23 496

NOTE: Not all provinces submit animals to the CWHC for testing.

CAUSE OF DEATH

Province Emaciation Infectious/Inflammatory Toxicity/Poisoning Trauma Other
Birds 28 63 27 72 72
Mammals 24 66 10 54 57
Other 0 2 1 5 15
TOTAL 52 131 38 131 144

NOTE: An additional 34 cases submitted to CWHC in this quarter are still pending cause of death determination; 16 birds, 15 mammals, and 3 other species. ‘Other’ diagnoses include neoplastic, metabolic, and degenerative diseases as well as those cases where no cause of death could be determined.


SELECTED DISEASE COUNTS

  Examined Positive  
Rabies 95 3 Provincial summary
White Nose Syndrome 28 3 Provincial summary
Avian Influenza 408 7 Provincial summary
Chronic Wasting Disease 86 10 Provincial summary
Bovine Tuberculosis 33 0 Provincial summary
Canine Distemper 40 17 Provincial summary

Provincial Rabies Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 4 0
British Columbia 2 1
Manitoba 2 0
New Brunswick 6 1
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 3 1
Nova Scotia 9 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 17 0
Prince Edward Island 2 0
Québec 36 0
Saskatchewan 14 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial White Nose Syndrome Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 6 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 9 2
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 2 0
Prince Edward Island 1 1
Québec 5 0
Saskatchewan 5 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Influenza Summary [CLOSE]

DEAD BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 21 0 0 0
British Columbia 194 5 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 15 0 0 0
Nunavut 1 0 0 0
Ontario 21 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 5 0 0 0
Québec 7 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 0 0 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

LIVE BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 0 0 0 0
British Columbia 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 144 2 0 2
Prince Edward Island 0 0 0 0
Québec 0 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 0 0 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

Provincial Chronic Wasting Disease Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 2 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 3 0
Saskatchewan 81 10
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Bovine Tuberculosis Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 2 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 3 0
Saskatchewan 27 0
Yukon 1 0

Provincial Canine Distemper Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 4 1
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 2 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 3 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 17 13
Prince Edward Island 1 0
Québec 4 1
Saskatchewan 9 2
Yukon 0 0

NOTE: The cases reported above represent the data that are currently available in the CWHC database and should be considered preliminary. These data do not include all diagnostic testing for the selected pathogens carried out in Canada; additional testing is performed by other agencies and organisations. Examined refers to any candidate species for this disease. Testing is not always performed, unless the disease is suspected during necropsy or histological examination.


DIAGNOSTIC HIGHLIGHTS

Snake fungal disease found in Ontario

The presence of snake fungal disease has been confirmed in Ontario by CWHC Ontario/Nunavut. A female eastern foxsnake with dermatitis was found near Lake Erie and treated in captivity. Samples were submitted to the CWHC because the lesions were consistent with snake fungal disease. The presence of the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola (the agent causing snake fungal disease) was confirmed by culturing the fungus as well as by PCR, and snake fungal disease was confirmed with histological examination of a full depth skin biopsy. This is believed to be the first documented case of snake fungal disease in Canada. The disease has previously been confirmed in 16 US states.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/snake-fungal-disease-found-in-ontario-canada/

 

Brain abscesses in male white-tailed and mule deer

CWHC Western/Northern has received a larger-than-usual number of submissions this winter involving brain abscesses in male white-tailed and mule deer. The deer were typically reported acting abnormally, appearing to be blind or uncoordinated, or in some cases being found down and unresponsive. In several cases, the cause was found to be infection beginning at the base of one or both antlers and extending through the bones of the skull and into the brain, resulting in a pus-filled abscess. CWHC Ontario/Nunavut also diagnosed brain abscesses in two white-tailed bucks during this past winter.
The explanation for the cluster of cases this winter is unknown, but the occurrence of brain abscesses in male deer is not uncommon; it is thought to be related to behaviour prior to and during the rut. Antler rubbing and sparring with other bucks can result in trauma to the antler base, which serves as an entry point for bacteria. The bacteria Trueperella pyogenes, which is commonly found on healthy animals, was most frequently isolated from the abscesses.


WILDLIFE HEALTH TRACKER

White-nose syndrome in Washington

In March, 2016, white-nose syndrome was diagnosed in a dead little brown myotis found in Washington state, over 2,000 km outside of the previously known range of the disease. This devastating disease has been spreading west since it was first reported in North America in 2006, but its sudden appearance on the west coast was unexpected. Neighbouring British Columbia has responded to the implications of this finding by increasing surveillance for the disease and urging the public to report unusual bat activity.

Read more

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/bat-white-nose-syndrome-west-1.3525754

 

Cuvier’s beaked whale stranding in Atlantic Canada

A Cuvier’s beaked whale was found stranded on a beach in New Harbour, Nova Scotia. Aside from one possible case on Sable Island, the species has never before been found stranded in Atlantic Canada. CWHC Atlantic carried out a necropsy the whale, but were unable to identify a definitive cause of the stranding. New Brunswick Museum plans to display the whale’s skeleton in their ‘Hall of the Great Whales’ exhibit.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/necropsy-of-a-cuviers-beaked-whale/
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/beaked-whale-brunswick-museum-new-harbour-1.3450342

 

Sea star die-off expected to have lasting consequences

Sea star populations along the Pacific Coast continue to be affected by sea star wasting disease. The unprecedented mortality event is expected to have lasting ecological consequences, as many of the species involved serve as keystone species in their habitats. 

Read more

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/starfish-die-off-ecosystem-kelp-1.3552859

 

Snare-related deaths of cougars and birds of prey in Saskatchewan and Alberta

A high number cougars and eagles killed by snares were reported in Saskatchewan and Alberta during this winter. Reports of 15 cougars and an eagle snared in central Alberta rekindled ongoing controversy over trapping techniques. Although alarming, numbers like these are not unusual. This winter in southern Saskatchewan, four cougars, two bald eagles, and two golden eagles were reported accidentally snared.

Read more

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/calgary/wolf-snares-kill-cougars-sundre-1.3483278


FEATURED PROJECT

Wildlife as sentinels for climate change

Climate change represents one of the most significant public health risks worldwide. The effects of climate change are evident and ongoing in Canada. Given the uncertainties associated with climate change it is critical to systematically scan the environment for early warning signals that could inform public health decisions in advance of human harm. The purpose of an early warning system is to empower individuals, communities and/or organizations to respond in a timely and appropriate manner in order to avoid, reduce or mitigate harm.

There is an extensive history of wildlife serving as bio-sentinels for the effects and distribution of environmental pollutants and pathogens. The role of wildlife as bio-indicators is anticipated to increase given the expectation of changing distributions and burdens of pathogens and pollutants in the face of climate change. Wild animals can also signal vulnerabilities in social determinants of health and resilience. These contributions are made through their role in food security, income, and social capital. Climate change is anticipated to impact the distribution and abundance of wildlife, thereby affecting their public health impacts, particularly in northern and rural areas.

In partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada and working with international colleagues from within our network, the CWHC recently examined the potential for wildlife to contribute to the early warning system for public health preparedness of climate change in Canada. In this analysis the CWHC identified five scenarios where wildlife are likely to help us anticipate how climate change will affect communities. The end result is a proposed approach to support proactive planning.

 

QUARTER 4 - 2015 (OCT 1 - DEC 31)

Numbers are correct as of January 21, 2016

NATIONAL REPORT
Q4 - 2015

CWHC

DOWNLOAD

 

ONTARIO/NUNAVUT REPORT
Q4 - 2015

CWHC

DOWNLOAD

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY REGION

Region Mammals Birds Other Total
Pacific 59 149 0 208
Prairie 91 165 9 265
Central Canada 73 142 7 222
Atlantic 29 42 5 76
North 4 5 0 9
TOTAL 256 503 21 780

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY PROVINCE

Province Mammals Birds Other Total
Alberta 18 42 0 60
British Columbia 59 149 0 208
Manitoba 4 0 0 4
New Brunswick 5 16 1 22
Newfoundland and Labrador 1 0 0 1
Northwest Territories 0 5 0 5
Nova Scotia 13 3 4 20
Nunavut 3 0 0 3
Ontario 57 53 1 111
Prince Edward Island 10 23 0 33
Québec 16 89 6 111
Saskatchewan 69 123 9 201
Yukon 1 0 0 1
TOTAL 256 503 21 780

NOTE: Not all provinces submit animals to the CWHC for testing.

CAUSE OF DEATH

Province Emaciation Infectious/Inflammatory Toxicity/Poisoning Trauma Other
Birds 40 139 26 193 23
Mammals 11 99 5 57 61
Other 1 7 1 0 10
TOTAL 52 245 32 250 94

NOTE: An additional 107 cases submitted to CWHC in this quarter are still pending cause of death determination; 82 birds, 23 mammals, and 2 other species. ‘Other’ diagnoses include neoplastic, metabolic, and degenerative diseases as well as those cases where no cause of death could be determined.


SELECTED DISEASE COUNTS

  Examined Positive  
Rabies 236 4 Provincial summary
White Nose Syndrome 21 0 Provincial summary
Avian Influenza 850 104 Provincial summary
Chronic Wasting Disease 198 15 Provincial summary
Bovine Tuberculosis 65 0 Provincial summary
Avian Cholera 206 79 Provincial summary

Provincial Rabies Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 7 0
British Columbia 5 0
Manitoba 3 0
New Brunswick 5 1
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 3 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 0 0
Prince Edward Island 8 0
Québec 179 1
Saskatchewan 26 2
Yukon 0 0

Provincial White Nose Syndrome Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 5 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 4 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 1 0
Saskatchewan 11 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Influenza Summary [CLOSE]

DEAD BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 114 1 0 0
British Columbia 359 17 1 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 3 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 40 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 16 2 0 0
Québec 36 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 82 2 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

LIVE BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 0 0 0 0
British Columbia 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 200 82 2 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0 0 0
Québec 0 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 0 0 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

Provincial Chronic Wasting Disease Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 1 0
British Columbia 2 0
Manitoba 2 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 1 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 7 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 8 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 2 0
Saskatchewan 173 15
Yukon 1 0

Provincial Bovine Tuberculosis Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 9 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 2 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 7 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 8 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 2 0
Saskatchewan 36 0
Yukon 1 0

Provincial Avian Cholera Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 12 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 9 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 2 0
Nova Scotia 2 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 36 0
Prince Edward Island 13 0
Québec 33 0
Saskatchewan 99 791
Yukon 0 0

1 78 positives in Saskatchewan were a part of a single mortality event

NOTE: The cases reported above represent the data that are currently available in the CWHC database and should be considered preliminary. These data do not include all diagnostic testing for the selected pathogens carried out in Canada; additional testing is performed by other agencies and organisations. Examined refers to any candidate species for this disease. Testing is not always performed, unless the disease is suspected during necropsy or histological examination.


DIAGNOSTIC HIGHLIGHTS

Chronic wasting disease 2014/2015 season update

  • CWD surveillance recommenced this year in Saskatchewan with CWHC Western/Northern testing a number of hunter-harvested deer for the disease.
  • Although a small number of heads were tested across the province, results showed a higher proportion of positives than found in previous years, including positive cases in four new Wildlife Management Zones.
  • These results suggest that CWD is continuing to increase and spread in SK deer populations.

Read more

http://www.cwhc-rcsf.ca/data_products_cwd.php

Raccoon rabies in Ontario

  • A case of raccoon strain rabies was detected in Hamilton, ON in December; the first case in the province since 2005, prompting OMNRF to ramp up vaccination and surveillance efforts.
  • Several additional cases were subsequently detected within and outside of the original area.
  • OMNRF is urging pet owners to ensure that their pets are up to date with vaccinations.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/raccoon-rabies-in-ontario/
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/news/raccoon-with-rabies-found-in-hamilton-after-fight-with-dogs-1.3352980
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/news/province-dropping-rabies-vaccine-from-the-sky-above-hamilton-1.3354338


WILDLIFE HEALTH TRACKER

Snowy Owl deaths across Canada

An increase in Snowy Owl deaths during fall 2015 was seen by multiple CWHC regions. The majority of the birds were juveniles and were found to have died of either starvation or trauma.


Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/a-die-off-of-snowy-owls-in-the-fall/
http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/snowy-owl-update---cwhc-quebec/
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/more-dying-snowy-owls-being-found-by-sask-wildlife-rescue-1.3297425
http://www.thestarphoenix.com/technology/dead+dying+owls+likely+victims+summer+fires/11476912/story.html
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/snowy-owls-sick-nwt-1.3315478

Orca baby boom

Two orca calves were born off the BC coast during this quarter, bringing the total number of calves to eight during 2015. This ‘baby boom’ brought hope that the endangered southern resident population may be rebounding.


Read more

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/2015-orca-baby-boom-1.3382635

 

Alberta grizzly bear population increase

Foothills Research Institute reported higher than expected increases in AB foothills grizzly bear population over the past decade. Increases may be due in part to bears being relocated into the area by enforcement officers.


Read more

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/grizzly-bear-recovery-study-1.3272104

 

Avian cholera outbreak in Saskatchewan

An outbreak of avian cholera occurred near Rosetown, SK in November. CWHC Western/Northern confirmed the diagnosis after receiving 78 geese (Snow, Ross’s, and Greater White-fronted) from the outbreak. A Bald Eagle from the area was subsequently found to have died of the disease as well.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/day-6-six-geese-a-laying/


FEATURED PROJECT

Analysis of wetland sediment for avian influenza surveillance

The avian influenza (AI) outbreaks of 2014/2015 on poultry farms highlighted the need for a seasonal early warning system for the presence/absence of AI viruses in wild waterfowl. This would allow producers and government to implement biosecurity and surveillance measures appropriate for the level of risk. CWHC BC developed a new approach to this problem based on genomic analysis of wetland sediments. Given that waterfowl congregate on wetlands, the BC team recognized the potential of testing wetland sediments to efficiently screen a large number of waterfowl encompassing a wide range of potential reservoir species. So far, the technique appears quite promising, as they were able to detect AI virus in up to 37% of sediment samples. They are further analyzing PCR-positive samples to characterize the AI viruses, and conducting analysis in conjunction with a waterfowl ecology study to better understand the dynamics of AI in the environment. The next step is to meet with local, provincial, and national stakeholders to share results and discuss the next steps for validating and implementing AI sediment surveillance. Ultimately, the goal is to use sediment surveillance as the cornerstone for developing an effective provincial AI early warning system.

For more information on avian influenza, visit our AI Portal: http://www.cwhc-rcsf.ca/aiv

 

QUARTER 3 - 2015 (JUL 1 - SEP 30)

Numbers are correct as of October 16, 2015

NATIONAL REPORT
Q3 - 2015

CWHC

DOWNLOAD

 

ONTARIO/NUNAVUT REPORT
Q3 - 2015

CWHC

DOWNLOAD

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY REGION

Region Mammals Birds Other Total
Pacific 27 18 0 45
Prairie 57 124 2 183
Central Canada 94 285 18 397
Atlantic 46 94 1 141
North 2 6 0 8
TOTAL 226 527 21 774

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY PROVINCE

Province Mammals Birds Other Total
Alberta 6 0 0 6
British Columbia 18 27 0 45
Manitoba 0 2 0 2
New Brunswick 16 7 0 23
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest Territories 5 0 0 5
Nova Scotia 8 20 0 28
Nunavut 1 0 0 1
Ontario 44 95 12 151
Prince Edward Island 70 21 1 92
Québec 189 46 6 241
Saskatchewan 119 57 2 178
Yukon 0 2 0 2

NOTE: Not all provinces submit animals to the CWHC for testing.

CAUSE OF DEATH

Province Emaciation Infectious/Inflammatory Toxicity/Poisoning Trauma Other
Birds 77 67 34 227 41
Mammals 19 67 4 57 47
Other 0 2 0 6 6
TOTAL 96 136 38 290 94

NOTE: An additional 120 cases submitted to CWHC in this quarter are still pending final cause of death determination; 81 birds, 32 mammals, and 7 other species. ‘Other’ diagnoses include neoplastic, metabolic, and degenerative diseases as well as those cases where no cause of death could be determined.


SELECTED DISEASE COUNTS

  Examined Positive  
Rabies 141 12 Provincial summary
West Nile Virus 527 29 Provincial summary
Avian Influenza 3222 420 Provincial summary
Newcastle Disease 527 3 Provincial summary
Avian Cholera 172 1 Provincial summary
Avian Botulism 172 4 Provincial summary

Provincial Rabies Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 0 0
British Columbia 18 1
Manitoba 1 0
New Brunswick 6 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 12 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 38 0
Prince Edward Island 9 0
Québec 28 4
Saskatchewan 29 7
Yukon 0 0

Provincial West Nile Virus Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 5 0
British Columbia 18 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 16 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 5 0
Nova Scotia 8 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 95 16
Prince Edward Island 70 0
Québec 190 12
Saskatchewan 119 1
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Influenza Summary [CLOSE]

DEAD BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 184 0
British Columbia 31 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 10 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 23 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 7 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 87 0
Prince Edward Island 44 0
Québec 49 6 0 0
Saskatchewan 196 2 0 0
Yukon 0 0

LIVE BIRD

Province Examined Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 524 10 0 3
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 1467 375 27 1
Prince Edward Island 0 0
Québec 0 0
Saskatchewan 600 27 2 3
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Newcastle Disease Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 5 0
British Columbia 18 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 16 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 5 0
Nova Scotia 8 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 95 3
Prince Edward Island 70 0
Québec 190 0
Saskatchewan 119 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Cholera Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 5 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 3 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 2 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 33 0
Prince Edward Island 36 0
Québec 61 0
Saskatchewan 31 1
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Botulism Summary [CLOSE]

Province Examined Positive
Alberta 5 0
British Columbia 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New Brunswick 3 0
Newfoundland and Labrador 0 0
Northwest Territories 0 0
Nova Scotia 2 0
Nunavut 1 0
Ontario 33 0
Prince Edward Island 36 0
Québec 61 0
Saskatchewan 31 4
Yukon 0 0

NOTE: The cases reported above represent the data that are currently available in the CWHC database and should be considered preliminary. These data do not include all diagnostic testing for the selected pathogens carried out in Canada; additional testing is performed by other agencies and organisations. Examined refers to any candidate species for this disease. Testing is not always performed, unless the disease is suspected during necropsy or histological examination.


DIAGNOSTIC HIGHLIGHTS

Enhanced wild bird AIV surveillance

  • In response to the 2014/15 outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (AIV) on poultry farms in Canada and the US, targeted surveillance for AIV in wild birds has been increased in Canada, including live waterfowl testing in some regions.
  • CWHC Western/Northern tested over 500 live waterfowl in Saskatchewan, with three confirmed H7 positives.
  • CWHC Ontario/Nunavut tested almost 1500 live waterfowl in Ontario, with 27 H5 and one H7 confirmed positive.
  • No highly pathogenic strains have been found thus far during the 2015 surveillance season.

Read more

http://www.cwhc-rcsf.ca/data_products_aiv.php
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrcT5H3K61w&feature=youtu.be
http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/canadas-wild-bird-survey-for-avian-influenza-is-underway/

 

Newly developed snake fungal disease diagnostic test

  • Snake fungal disease has been identified in US snakes since the 1990s and could pose a major threat to snake populations in Canada.
  • There is a need for consistent methods to diagnose this disease in snakes. CWHC Ontario/Nunavut has responded to this need by developing a diagnostic test to detect the fungus associated with the disease.

WILDLIFE HEALTH TRACKER

Bluetongue in cattle

In September, a case of bluetongue was confirmed on a Southwestern Ontario cattle farm, a finding that has implications for international trade. CWHC Ontario/Nunavut has increased vigilance for epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) in wildlife, particularly deer, due to the close relationship between the viruses and their shared vector: biting midges of the Culicoides genus.

 

Beluga update

Overall, there were fewer reports of deaths in St. Lawrence beluga whales in this past year. Despite the good news, three of the seven carcasses examined by CWHC Quebec were found to have died during parturition, which is an unusually high number. Earlier in the year, a beluga whale found dead in the region was found to be a case of hermaphrodism, a condition rarely seen in wild or domestic animals.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/hermaphrodism-in-a-beluga-whale/

 

Avian botulism - Quill Lakes

CWHC Western/Northern investigated a suspected botulism outbreak on the Quill Lakes in Saskatchewan. Many sick and dead waterfowl showed characteristic signs of botulism toxicity. Botulism was confirmed as the cause of the outbreak.

Read more

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/suspected-avian-botulism-outbreak-on-quill-lakes-sk/

 

Bat rabies cases

Ongoing surveillance for rabies across Canada has detected several cases of bat rabies in Saskatchewan and Québec during this quarter. Six cases were found in Saskatchewan and five in Québec during the time period, serving as a reminder of the importance of ongoing vigilance for this and other zoonotic diseases.

Read more

http://globalnews.ca/news/2203434/sask-pet-owners-warned-to-vaccinate-pets-after-rabies-found-in-bats/


FEATURED PROJECT

Bat White-nose Syndrome program enjoys success

The Canadian National Bat White-nose Syndrome (WNS) Coordinator position is embedded in CWHC, Atlantic Region; Jordi Segers is the current coordinator. Since the Federal listing of the three species of bats most affected by bat WNS under the Species at Risk Act, Jordi and the CWHC have not only focussed on disease response but have become integral partners in the effort to recover the bat populations affected by WNS.

Recent successes in program delivery include a revision of the decontamination protocol for people entering bat hibernacula and provision of technical expertise for the production of Parks Canada’s instructional video on decontamination procedures; proper decontamination is crucial to limit further spread of WNS. Additionally, CWHC Atlantic Region’s Scott McBurney and Jordi Segers have developed and implemented a bat monitoring and inventory program for Prince Edward Island National Park based on the North American Bat Monitoring Program. This program allows the park to meet Parks Canada Agency’s ecological integrity mandate and visitor educational and outreach requirements.

Visualization of a bat’s echolocation call