The new CWHC website is currently being modified to display properly on mobile devices. In the meantime, please use a laptop or tablet if you cannot access the information you require.Le nouveau site Web du RCSF est actuellement en cours de modification afin de permettre un affichage sur appareils mobiles. D'ici là, veuillez utiliser un ordinateur portable ou une tablette si les informations requises ne sont pas visibles.
EN - FR
REPORT & SUBMITRAPPORTS ET SOUMISSIONS SURVEILLANCE & RESPONSESURVEILLANCE ET RÉPONSE REPORTSRAPPORTS PUBLICATIONS ABOUT USÀ PROPOS DE NOUS REGIONSRÉGIONS

QUARTERLY REPORTSRAPPORTS TRIMESTRIELES

Select quarterChoisir le trimestre:

QUARTER 4 - 2020 (OCT 1 - DEC 31)Trimestre 4 - 2020 (1 octobre – 31 décembre)

Numbers are correct as of Jan 18, 2020Ces nombres ont été mis à jour le 18 janvier 2020

NATIONAL REPORTRAPPORT NATIONAL
QTrimestre 4 - 2020

CWHC CWHC

ENGLISH - FRANÇAIS

 

ONTARIO/NUNAVUT REPORT
Q4 - 2020

CWHC

ENGLISH

 

ANNUAL REPORT

CWHC

ENGLISH

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY REGIONAnimaux soumis par région

RegionRégion MammalsMammifères BirdsOiseaux OtherAutres Total
PacificPacifique 60 182 0 242
PrairiePrairies 182 65 1 248
Central CanadaCentre du Canada 42 125 26 193
AtlanticAtlantique 27 63 14 104
NorthNord 0 1 0 1
TOTAL 311 436 41 788

ANIMALS SUBMITTED BY PROVINCEAnimaux soumis par province

Province MammalsMammifères BirdsOiseaux OtherAutres Total
Alberta 44 28 1 73
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 60 182 0 242
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 1 1 0 2
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 2 0 0 2
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 0 1 0 1
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 14 14 1 29
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 25 53 19 97
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 10 48 13 71
Québec 17 72 7 96
Saskatchewan 138 37 0 175
Yukon 0 0 0 0
TOTAL 311 436 41 788

NOTE: Not all provinces submit animals to the CWHC for testing.Seulement certaines provinces soumettent des animaux au RCSF pour des tests.

CAUSE OF DEATHCAUSE DE MORTALITÉ

  EmaciationÉmaciation Infectious/InflammatoryInfection/inflammation Toxicity/PoisoningToxicité/empoisonnement TraumaTraumatisme OtherAutre
BirdsOiseaux 32 73 12 178 80
MammalsMammifères 10 110 2 23 119
OtherAutres 0 2 0 10 15
TOTAL 42 185 14 211 214

NOTE: An additional 122 cases submitted to CWHC in this quarter are still pending cause of death determination; 61 birds, 47 mammals, and 14 other species. ‘Other’ diagnoses include neoplastic, metabolic, and degenerative diseases as well as those cases where no cause of death could be determined.Dans 168 autres cas soumis au RCSF pendant ce trimestre, la cause de mortalité n’a pas encore été déterminée, à savoir chez 83 oiseaux, 79 mammifères et 6 autres espèces. La catégorie de diagnostic « autre » inclut les maladies néoplasiques, métaboliques et dégénératives ainsi que les cas où la cause de mortalité n’a pu être déterminée.


SELECTED DISEASE COUNTSNOMBRE DE CAS DE CERTAINES MALADIES SÉLECTIONNÉES

  ExaminedExaminés PositivePositif  
RabiesRage 470 4 Provincial summarySommaire provincial
White nose syndromeSyndrome du museau blanc 41 2 Provincial summarySommaire provincial
Avian InfluenzaInfluenza aviaire 347 1 Provincial summarySommaire provincial
Chronic wasting diseaseMaladie débilitante chronique 1456 33 Provincial summarySommaire provincial
Bovine tuberculosisTuberculose bovine 130 0 Provincial summarySommaire provincial
Avian CholeraCholéra aviaire 33 0 Provincial summarySommaire provincial

Provincial Rabies SummarySommaire provincial - Rage [CLOSE]

Province ExaminedExaminés PositivePositif
Alberta 44 0
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 138 0
Manitoba 0 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 0 0
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 1 0
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 2 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 31 1
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 37 0
Québec 66 0
Saskatchewan 28 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Cholera SummarySommaire provincial - Choléra aviaire [CLOSE]

Province ExaminedExaminés PositivePositif
Alberta 0 0
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 0 0
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 0 0
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 11 0
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 12 0
Québec 2 0
Saskatchewan 8 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Avian Influenza SummarySommaire provincial - Influenza aviair [CLOSE]

Province Tested Matrix +ve H5 +ve H7 +ve
Alberta 44 0 0 0
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 138 0 0 0
Manitoba 0 0 0 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 0 0 0 0
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 0 0 0 0
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 1 0 0 0
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 2 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0
Ontario 31 1 0 0
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 37 0 0 0
Québec 66 0 0 0
Saskatchewan 28 0 0 0
Yukon 0 0 0 0

Provincial Bovine tuberculosis SummarySommaire provincial - Tuberculose bovine [CLOSE]

Province ExaminedExaminés PositivePositif
Alberta 0 0
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 0 0
Manitoba 0 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 0 0
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 0 0
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 2 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 4 0
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 0 0
Québec 6 0
Saskatchewan 118 0
Yukon 0 0

Provincial Chronic wasting disease SummarySommaire provincial - Maladie débilitante chronique [CLOSE]

Province ExaminedExaminés PositivePositif
Alberta 0 0
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 1326 0
Manitoba 0 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 0 0
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 0 0
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 2 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 4 0
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 0 0
Québec 6 0
Saskatchewan 118 33
Yukon 0 0

Provincial White nose syndrome SummarySommaire provincial - Syndrome du museau blanc [CLOSE]

Province ExaminedExaminés PositivePositif
Alberta 0 0
British ColumbiaColombie-Britannique 10 0
Manitoba 0 0
New BrunswickNouveau-Brunswick 0 0
Newfoundland and LabradorTerre-Neuve-et-Labrador 0 0
Northwest TerritoriesTerritoires du Nord-Ouest 0 0
Nova ScotiaNouvelle-Écosse 0 0
Nunavut 0 0
Ontario 1 0
Prince Edward IslandÎle-du-Prince-Édouard 0 0
Québec 18 2
Saskatchewan 12 0
Yukon 0 0

NOTE: The cases reported above represent the data that are currently available in the CWHC database and should be considered preliminary. These data do not include all diagnostic testing for the selected pathogens carried out in Canada; additional testing is performed by other agencies and organisations. Examined refers to any candidate species for this disease. Testing is not always performed, unless the disease is suspected during necropsy or histological examination.Les cas rapportés ci-haut représentent les données actuellement disponibles dans la base de données du RCSF. Il s’agit de données préliminaires. Ces données ne couvrent pas l’ensemble des tests diagnostiques entourant les pathogènes sélectionnés puisque des tests sont aussi effectués par d’autres agences et organisations canadiennes. « Examiné » réfère à toute espèce candidate relativement à la maladie. On ne procède pas toujours à des tests ; on attend parfois que la présence d’une maladie soit présumée suite à une nécropsie ou à un examen histologique.


DIAGNOSTIC HIGHLIGHTSFAITS SAILLANTS EN MATIÈRE DE DIAGNOSTIC

Why did the moose drink the water? Death at a prairie dugout.

In late September of 2020, three moose were reported dead in a dugout in rural Saskatchewan. The moose had been seen alive in the area two days prior by the renter of the land. Local conservation officers from Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment Humboldt field office investigated the scene and did not find any signs of bullet wounds or other obvious cause of death. A water sample was also collected from the dugout and submitted for testing.

Back at the lab, thorough postmortem investigations were carried out on both carcasses. The adult male was in good body condition, which suggests a relatively short illness or sudden death. Gunshot was ruled out and tests were performed to rule out other common causes of sudden death, including lead poisoning, insecticide poisoning, and anthrax. Both animals were found to have toxic, life threatening levels of sodium in the brain. This is an indicator of severe dehydration which can lead to shock and death.
The water sample from the dugout had also been sent out for a water quality assessment, with the hope that the results would shed some light on the circumstances. The results showed several issues with the water source, including extremely high levels of sulfur, sodium, chloride, and sulphate. Although acceptable levels for moose are not available, the levels found in the submitted water sample were above the range noted to cause dangerous health issues in cattle.

Although the water quality seems a likely explanation for the death of these three moose, we were left with one big question: Why would they drink the water? The weather was unseasonably warm in late September (>20oC during the days of the incident) and the moose would have had significant water requirements (20-50 L/day). Unlike cattle, however, moose would be free to roam in search of other water sources as needed. As in many wildlife health investigations, we may never know all the details surrounding the incident and are sometimes left with more questions than answers; however, the incident allowed us to alert the landowner about the unsuitability of the dugout for livestock.

Pourquoi les orignaux ont-ils bu cette eau? Mortalité liée à un étang-réservoir dans les prairies.

On a rapporté la mortalité de trois orignaux dans un étang-réservoir, dans une zone rurale de la Saskatchewan, à la fin de septembre 2020. Ces orignaux avaient été observés vivants deux jours auparavant, dans cette même zone, par le locataire du terrain. Après avoir examiné la scène, les agents de conservation du bureau régional de Humboldt du ministère de l’Environnement de la Saskatchewan n’ont identifié aucun signe de blessure par balle ni autre cause de mortalité. Un échantillon d’eau prélevé dans l’étang a été soumis pour analyse.

Des analyses post mortem ont été effectuées en laboratoire sur deux carcasses. Le mâle adulte était en bon état de chair, ce qui laissait supposer une maladie de courte durée ou une mort subite. Après avoir éliminé toute possibilité de mort par balle, des tests ont été effectués pour éliminer certaines causes courantes de mort subite, y compris un empoisonnement au plomb ou aux insecticides et l’anthrax. Des taux de sodium potentiellement mortels ont été détectés dans le cerveau de ces deux animaux. De tels taux sont un indicateur de déshydratation sévère pouvant entraîner un choc et la mort.

L’échantillon d’eau prélevé dans l’étang a été soumis à des analyses en espérant faire la lumière sur les circonstances de la mort des animaux. Ces analyses ont révélé plusieurs problèmes liés à la source d’eau. Celle-ci contenait des taux extrêmement élevés de soufre, sodium, chlorure et sulfate. Bien qu’on ignore les taux acceptables de ces composés chez les orignaux, les taux détectés dans les échantillons soumis étaient supérieurs à l’écart pouvant entraîner de graves troubles de santé chez le bétail.

Bien que la mauvaise qualité de l’eau puisse expliquer la mortalité des trois orignaux, une question importante demeure en suspens. Pourquoi ces animaux ont-ils bu cette eau? Compte tenu que la température était plus élevée que la normale à la fin de septembre en Saskatchewan (> 20o C pendant les jours entourant l’incident), les orignaux avaient des besoins d’eau élevés (20-50 L/jour). Contrairement au bétail toutefois, les orignaux se déplacent en liberté à la recherche de sources d’eau. Comme c’est le cas dans de nombreuses enquêtes sur la santé chez des animaux sauvages, il est impossible de connaître tous les détails entourant l’incident. On reste souvent avec plus de questions que de réponses. L’analyse de cet incident nous a toutefois permis d’avertir le propriétaire du terrain de la toxicité de l’étang pour le bétail.

 


WILDLIFE HEALTH TRACKERSUIVI DE LA SANTÉ DE LA FAUNE

Bat Health Webinar

The National Office organized a mini-webinar at which speakers from various agencies and from across the country addressed a wide range of topics relating to bat health in Canada.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/cwhc-organizes-bat-health-mini-webinar/

 

Invasive Wild Pig Webinar

Travis Black, Colorado Parks & Wildlife, gave a seminar on identifying the differences between wild and feral pigs and their domestic cousins.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/webinar-on-feral-and-wild-pig-id/

 

Swollen Muzzle in a White-tailed Deer

An adult male white-tailed deer was presented to the Ontario-Nunavut region with a history of having poor balance while seen walking on a property in London, Ontario.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/swollen-muzzle-in-a-white-tailed-deer/

 

Calcium oxalate crystals in the kidneys

The presence of calcium oxalate crystals in the kidneys of a sandhill crane recently submitted for necropsy made us wonder about the possible origins of these crystals.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/calcium-oxalate-crystals-in-the-kidneys/

Webinaire sur la santé des chauves-souris

Le bureau national a organisé un mini-webinaire au cours duquel des conférenciers provenant de diverses agences de l’ensemble du Canada ont traité d’une vaste gamme de sujets entourant la santé des chauves-souris.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/cwhc-organizes-bat-health-mini-webinar/

 

Webinaire sur les cochons sauvages invasifs

Travis Black de Colorado Parks & Wildlife a dispensé un webinaire visant à identifier les différences entre les cochons sauvages et les sangliers d’une part et leurs cousins domestiques d’autre part.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/webinar-on-feral-and-wild-pig-id/

 

Œdème du museau chez un cerf de Virginie

Un cerf de Virginie mâle adulte qui avait été observé titubant sur une propriété à London, Ontario a été soumis pour analyses au Centre régional de l’Ontario/Nunavut du RCSF.

http ://blog.healthywildlife.ca/swollen-muzzle-in-a-white-tailed-deer/

 

Cristaux d’oxalate de calcium dans les reins

L’origine des cristaux d’oxalate de calcium trouvés dans les reins d’une grue du Canada soumise récemment pour nécropsie n’a pu être déterminée.

http://blog.healthywildlife.ca/calcium-oxalate-crystals-in-the-kidneys/


FEATURED PROJECTPROJET VEDETTE

Invasive Pig Project

The CWHC National office in partnership with Environment and Climate Change Canada is assembling and will be coordinating two working groups with participants from across Federal, Provincial and Territorial Environment and Agriculture departments, Indigenous groups and stakeholders.
1. A strategic group tasked with identifying national priorities and goals pertaining to feral swine management in Canada. Membership is based on those individuals with a responsibility for managing programs and developing policies i.e. decision makers and those most likely to be effected by the negative impacts of feral swine.
2. An operational group comprised of individuals engaged in active surveillance and/or control programs. The purpose of the group is to provide jurisdictions currently embarking on feral swine programs a venue to obtain knowledge from other groups where programs are well established.
This group will focus on sharing experience and information on immediate technical questions.

Key knowledge holders and ad hoc members have been identified and consulted, these individuals will participate or present to the working groups as needed.

The project’s main goal is to facilitate an action agenda to prevent and mitigate social and ecological harm of invasive pigs in Canada.

Projet sur l’invasion des cochons sauvages

Le bureau national du RCSF est en train de mettre en place deux groupes de travail dont il assurera ensuite la coordination en partenariat avec Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. Ces groupes de travail réuniront des représentants des ministères de l’Environnement et de l’Agriculture à l’échelon fédéral, provincial et territorial, des représentants d’organisations autochtones ainsi que divers intervenants. Il s’agit des deux groupes suivants :
1. Un groupe stratégique chargé de cibler les priorités et objectifs nationaux en matière de gestion des cochons sauvages au Canada. Les personnes responsables de la gestion de programmes et du développement de politiques, c’est-à-dire les décideurs, ainsi que celles qui risquent davantage d’être affectées par les impacts négatifs entraînés par les cochons sauvages seront invitées à participer à ce groupe de travail.
2. Un groupe opérationnel formé de personnes participant activement à des programmes de surveillance et/ou de contrôle. Ce groupe a pour objectif de fournir aux différentes administrations qui mettent en place des programmes liés aux cochons sauvages un mécanisme permettant de se renseigner auprès d’autres groupes dont les programmes sont bien établis. Ce groupe sera responsable du partage immédiat d’expériences et d’informations sur des questions techniques.

Les principaux détenteurs du savoir et les membres ad hoc ont déjà été identifiés et consultés. Ces personnes participeront aux groupes de travail ou leur feront des présentations au besoin.

Le principal objectif du projet consiste à faciliter la mise œuvre d’un plan d’action visant à prévenir ou réduire les retombées négatives de l’invasion des cochons sauvages au Canada sur le plan social et écologique.